Tag Archives: Wonder

Add the Book “Wonder” to your Tween’s TBR Pile!

 

Hello everyone! I hope all is well with you! I’m Lisa Orchard the bestselling author of “The Super Spies” series and I’m here today to recommend an awesome book for your tween.

Back in March, I read the book “Wonder.” So did my son. There were many lessons in that story and my son and I got to talking about a few of them. It was nice to have that kind of dialogue with him, and I chalked it up to a bonding moment between us.

The story is about Auggie Pullman, he has a birth defect that makes his face abnormal in appearance. He’s been homeschooled his whole life, but now he’s being mainstreamed into a public school. It’s the story of how Auggie deals with his peers reactions to his disability. It’s heartbreaking at times and you really feel his pain.

It’s also triumphant, because Auggie never quits even though he wants to. He’s a strong “little dude” and his strength shines through.

This is an incredible story of perseverance, empathy, and friendship. Lessons we all want our tweens to learn. I highly recommend this book. The cover and blurb are below.

How about you? Do you have any great book recommendations for tweens?

 

August Pullman was born with a facial difference that, up until now, has prevented him from going to a mainstream school. Starting 5th grade at Beecher Prep, he wants nothing more than to be treated as an ordinary kid—but his new classmates can’t get past Auggie’s extraordinary face. WONDER, now a #1 New York Times bestseller and included on the Texas Bluebonnet Award master list, begins from Auggie’s point of view, but soon switches to include his classmates, his sister, her boyfriend, and others. These perspectives converge in a portrait of one community’s struggle with empathy, compassion, and acceptance.

“Wonder is the best kids’ book of the year,” said Emily Bazelon, senior editor at Slate.com and author of Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy. In a world where bullying among young people is an epidemic, this is a refreshing new narrative full of heart and hope. R.J. Palacio has called her debut novel “a meditation on kindness” —indeed, every reader will come away with a greater appreciation for the simple courage of friendship. Auggie is a hero to root for, a diamond in the rough who proves that you can’t blend in when you were born to stand out.

 

20111210_ABS_1296[1]Lisa Orchard grew up loving books. She was hooked on books by the fifth grade and even wrote a few of her own. She knew she wanted to be a writer even then. Her first published works are the “Super Spies Series.” These stories revolve around a group of friends who form their own detective squad and the cases they solve. “The Starlight Chronicles,” is the next series Lisa created with musical misfit, Lark Singer as her main character.

Lisa resides in Michigan with her husband, Steve, and two wonderful boys. Currently, she’s working on the next book in the Starlight Chronicles Series along with a few new ideas that may turn into stand-alone novels. When she’s not writing she enjoys spending time with her family, running, hiking, and reading.

The Most Important Thing a Child Should be Doing

When a child reads a book they view it as a type of mirror world—as if by magic they become the main characters, living and breathing in that character’s mind. Gender holds no boundaries when it comes to this mirror world. Whether they are a boy or a girl, when they read Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, they become Harry Potter. When they read The Lightning Thief, they are Percy Jackson. The mirror world is not only beneficial to children because they get to learn about new places, but they get to experience emotions and situations they otherwise might not get to experience. The mirror world is why reading is the most important thing a child should be doing.

81zdSFzJh+LRecently I read a fantastic middle-grade book entitled, Wonder, by R. J. Palacio. This book is about an eleven-year-old boy named August Pullman (Auggie) who was born with mandibulofacial dysostosis, a very rare facial deformity. The book is written in first person so you really get to see into the mind of Auggie and how much others struggle with his face. People cringe, shy away, even scream when they see him. As I stepped into the mirror world and saw things the way Auggie did, I began to feel things I have never felt before. I was suddenly more aware of how I spoke to others and how I treated them. I wanted everyone to feel important. So often children don’t see how their looks and words can hurt others. One of the best lines from the book is: “… sometimes you don’t have to be mean to hurt someone.” Empathy is learned in the mirror world.

The mirror world can not only help children learn to feel what others go through, it can help children overcome fears and challenges. Bullying is something that happens all the time and there’s not much parents and teachers can do to stop it. The best way to extinguish the problem is the victim empowering themselves. The mirror world can do that. I was ecstatic when two years ago I received an email from one of my readers who had been dealing with a bully issue at school. readingThey said after they read about Kaelyn’s experience in The Dream Keeper they felt they could stand up to their bully. Reading had empowered them and their problems with the bully went away. They learned to stand up for themselves through a book! I think that’s amazing.

As parents, as teachers, as librarians, as human beings, we should be encouraging all children to step into the mirror world and embrace the magic within. Share with them good books that made you “feel” something when you read (yes, that means YOU should be reading too). The more they experience the better they will be able to deal with the world around them and understand the people within it.

-Mikey Brooks

 

Tales of Compassion

Once again, I walked through the landfill graveyard in Tijuana, Mexico. (See previous post, A Giant Web in the Brain – The Science of Creativity.) This time it was a bright Saturday afternoon in November.

securedownload

While I hiked the irregular and rutted ground to admire the Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) decorations, I witnessed an amazing act of spontaneous compassion coming from the children of the landfill. These children live in poverty that is truly unimaginable yet their hearts overflow with concern for less fortunate creatures.

It went down like this:

Twelve young children led by two 10-year-old girls, Fatima and Elly, played among the tombstones.

According to the girls, recounting the part of the story I hadn’t seen, a car speeding down the road struck and killed one of the stray dogs that roamed the landfill. The driver got out of his vehicle to make sure his car was okay, and as an afterthought, he tossed the dog into the graveyard.

Once he drove off, the children crowded around the poor dog, feeling pity for the animal. Upset by the man’s behavior, they tried to figure out what to do.

kids bringing the tools to bury the dog

Fatima and Elly took charge and led the younger kids across the road to a house where they borrowed a shovel and a garden spade.

They returned to the graveyard and set about finding a spot among the human graves to dig a final resting place for the “¡Pobre perrito!”

The ground was hard and they struggled. A volunteer from our medical team approached the children and offered to help dig the grave.

digging the grave

The kids handed her the shovel and a small grave was quickly dug in a shallow depression in the dirt near a bright blue tomb and bush full of berries.

Then the children took control again. They ran back to the dog’s body and carefully picked it up, carried it to the hole and gently placed it inside. They took turns covering it with dirt, then decorated the grave with boughs of berries, flowers and smooth stones arranged in the shape of a cross.

children holding their offerings for the grave

children decorating the grave children decorating the grave2 children decorating the grave3

 

 

 

 

 

After a few solemn moments at the gravesite, they eventually went back to playing, surrounded by all the colorful Day of the Dead tributes.

Children posing after the burial

I felt lucky to observe this simple act of compassion coming from these kids. As a dog owner, it was very moving to watch. These remarkable children had compassion far beyond their years and their circumstances. I told them so.

Have you ever seen young children show more concern than an adult? Why do some children show such compassion while others are bullies or brutal to their peers? Or to animals?

Empathy is the capacity to understand and appreciate the feelings of another and to use these feelings to guide one’s actions.

Learning compassion early in life certainly builds moral character, reduces bullying, and cultivates confidence. Teaching children compassion and respect for fellow human beings helps them become better adults and it also helps the less fortunate in their own communities.

Studies indicate there are several key experiences that actually teach kids compassion/empathy:

1) If they see compassion in action: Children learn by example. If they witness compassion in their lives, they absorb those qualities. Fatima and Elly were definitely teaching the younger children by their example.

2) If they actually live/practice compassion: Studies show that children who practice compassion at an early age will be more compassionate as teens and adults. This can include helping at a homeless shelter, donating to the needy, or burying an unfortunate animal. These twelve young kids took it upon themselves to be compassionate to an unfortunate dog.

3) If they read/hear stories of compassion: This is important for us as writers, teachers, and parents. Numerous studies show that reading literary fiction and/or other quality stories that demonstrate compassion greatly increases the reader’s empathy for others.

Compassion is a common character trait in good stories. Children that read these books or hear them read aloud are exposed to examples of human kindness that perhaps are missing in their regular lives.

Books can teach kids to be kind to one another, to animals, and to nature, all through the example found in a great story. This is one reason why fiction can be as important as non-fiction in a child’s education. It’s also why we need to think about our character’s traits when we write.

We should encourage those we know, teachers and parents and librarians, to obtain or read books that portray positive human qualities for the proven effect it has on young readers.

There are numerous books out there that convey a beautiful message about empathy or compassion in the storyline. It’s really hard to narrow down and pick a few classics to mention, but some of my favorites are:

securedownload-1

For the Very Young, but can be appreciated by all ages:

Sam and the Lucky Money by Karen Chinn

Angelo by David Macaulay

The Great Kapok Tree: A Tale of the Amazon Rain Forest by Lynne Cherry

securedownload-2

For Middle Grade and Tweens:

Charlotte’s Web by E. B. White

Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson

Because of Winn Dixie by Kate DiCamillo

Number the Stars by Lois Lowry

Black Beauty by Anna Sewell

Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls

One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate

Stone Fox by John Reynolds Gardiner

securedownload

Older Tweens and YA:

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

Wonder by R. J. Palacios

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

And many, many more…..

Have you witnessed spontaneous acts of compassion by young children? What are your favorite books that show compassion or empathy?

img_3925_2

Kathryn Sant is a retired obstetrician who has witnessed the births of thousands of future readers. She has published a middle-grade novel, Desert Chase (Scholastic), and under the pseudonym BBH McChiller she is a co-author of the fun, spooky Monster Moon mystery series. Curse at Zala Manor is the first book in the series, Secret of Haunted Bog is the second title, and Legend of Monster Island is the third. She is currently working on two middle-grade boys’ adventure novels and the next Monster Moon book.

Her interest in adventure, research, and genealogy has led to a love of world travel, exotic adventures, and museums of all kinds. But she also enjoys quiet evenings reading with her dogs at her side.