For a good time call…an Indie!

 

 

Dear Reader,

Writers are reputed to be a bit standoffish, a bit inside our own wonky, tortured heads. Many of us just don’t like our fellow human beings. By logical extension then, we authors, as a group, must not want to be bothered by the “little people” lucky enough to read our books, right? We must find such extra-literary contact irksome, sycophantic, even stalky.  I’m going to type this slowly so everyone will understand:

WHEN IT COMES TO INDIES, NOTHING COULD BE FURTHER FROM THE TRUTH!

I cannot speak for the Rowlings, the Kings or the Kingsolvers of this world because I don’t know any of them (sigh), but I know a lot (as in thousands) of indie authors, and to a person they revel in hearing from readers. I know this because the briefest note left on their Facebook author page or website, the slightest comment made in the grocery store, an email, a tweet, a blurry instagram pic (tinted to look like a Polaroid from 1963), anything that suggests someone out there likes their writing—sends that author trumpeting joy all over social media like a happiness t-shirt cannon. Hearing from readers makes indie authors giddily, unreasonably, even stalkily, happy.

So please, Readers, don’t be shy. Don’t be sitting there all on your lonesome as you turn the last page of a cool indie novel, thinking, “Gee willickers, I loved this book. I wonder if the author is going to write a sequel? I wonder if any of it is biographical? I wonder if the centaur knew the chewing gum was inside that marshmallow before he gave it to the toothless guinea pig? Oh, well, I guess I’ll never know, because surely this author wouldn’t want to hear from the likes of me.”

Wipe that niggling negativity right out of your neurons because, trust me—hearing from you is that author’s lifeblood and will make his/her day. You don’t even have to say anything brilliant, pithy or insightful. On the contrary, it would be impossible for you to make a comment or ask a question about an indie book that the author of said book does not want to receive. To prove my point, here are some questions that might, on the surface, seem unwelcome, followed by a typical indie author’s response:


 

Did you hire a two-year-old to write this drivel?

“Thank you so much for contacting me. Funny you should ask, because my two year old did give me the idea about the marshmallow and the gum!”


 

Why do you bother getting up in the morning if this is the result?

“So nice to hear from you. I do most of my writing in the evening.”


 

Can I pay you to stop writing books?

“That is so sweet. You mean like a Kickstarter?”


 

See? No harm no foul. Though if you do ask questions like these, you might find yourself written into a novel only to be gummed to death by a toothless guinea pig. But, hey, that could be adorable!

And one more thing: if you are a parent, grandparent or teacher, please encourage and help (as needed) a young person to contact a favorite indie author. I often hear from young readers, and it makes me even more unreasonably giddy than when I hear from adult readers, because adding to the pleasure a child experiences through reading is, well, one of the highest accomplishments I can think of.

If you’ve been hurt before in your attempts to form meaningful relationships with your favorite authors, we understand.  Send us a note, ask us a question—on Goodreads, Amazon, FB, snail mail, smoke signals or knuckle tattoo.  I promise: we’ll love you right back.

Cynthia Port is the author of the humorous fiction series, Kibble Talk, 2015 Readers’ Favorite Gold Award winner.

About Cynthia Port

Cynthia lives in the beautiful rolling hills of Southern Indiana with her husband, two daughters, and a head brimming with stories. Her first novel, Kibble Talk, was published toward the end of 2013. Book two in the Kibble Talk series, Dog Gone Dinky, was published in 2014, and Book 3, What Dat? is on its merry way. The Kibble Talk series is all about humor, but just underneath are heartfelt messages about acceptance and not taking the ones closest to us for granted. Young readers are hungry for lessons that will help guide them through the tough choices in their lives. So while my readers may come for the jokes, they stay for the experience of stepping into someone else's shoes and facing up to a challenge.

9 thoughts on “For a good time call…an Indie!

  1. But did the centaur know the chewing gum was inside that marshmallow before he gave it to the toothless guinea pig? Why was the guinea pig toothless? What flavor chewing gum was it? So many questions…

    1. Heh heh. Spoken like a true reader, Erik!! And I am now going to trumpet the fact that Thiskidreviewsbooks commented on my post all over social media like a happiness T-shirt cannon. 😉

      Meanwhile, here are your answers:
      Yes – he read it in the stars.
      Because of that time he climbed the Eiffel Tower using only his mouth…twice.
      Had to be marshmallow (because Guinea Pigs have an excellent sense of smell).
      The dolphin said so (I know you didn’t ask a fourth question, but you almost did, so I’m answering it anyway.)

  2. Dear Cynthia
    I am going to send George, Hector and Dylan around to gum you to death. Not only have they all had tooth trouble, but they are guinea pigs, despite being the heros of the Princelings of the East books (well, Hector has yet to appear in the series). And George would NEVER eat one of your books. Dylan? Well, Dylan would… but then he ate my crossword puzzles, too.
    love

    1. Seriously? How great is that? Of course you DO plan to work a centaur or two into your series as well, don’t you? And maybe some marshmallow treats? I had a pet guinea pig or two as a child. My brother and I were not very nice sometimes and gave them a little bit of chewing gum – they chewed and chewed it forever. We also dressed them up in doll clothes and pushed them around in a toy baby carriage. I guess if a pig of the guinea variety ever ate one of my books, I would consider it well-deserved revenge on behalf of its species. I’m sure you are nicer to your small furry friends.

    2. Seriously? How great is that? Of course you DO plan to work a centaur or two into your series as well, don’t you? And maybe some marshmallow treats? I had a pet guinea pig or two as a child. My brother and I were not very nice sometimes and gave them a little bit of chewing gum – they chewed and chewed it forever. We also dressed them up in doll clothes and pushed them around in a toy baby carriage. I guess if a pig of the guinea variety ever ate one of my books, I would consider it well-deserved revenge on behalf of its species. I’m sure you are nicer to your small furry friends.

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